coming out of my shell

coming out of my shell

Saturday, October 7, 2017

The more the merrier!


My husband, T, had his autosomal DNA tested last May in hopes of finding out his heritage. This is a popular endeavor in the U.S. right now and at least one other blogger has written about it recently.

Autosomal DNA gives you information about all your ancestors, not just ones in a male or female line. When you get the results it also gives you biological matches to near and distant relatives who have also had their DNA tested on ancestry.com, telling you what the matches are to you, like siblings, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cousins. Well, when he got his results it revealed to him that he has another biological daughter. BIG surprise! He had no idea. It was the 1960s, for crying out loud.

R was given up for adoption by her birth mother. She did her DNA test as a way to find her birth parents. Many of her DNA "cousin" matches had the same last name as T. Since she didn't know about T, and he had not yet submitted his DNA, the repeat appearances of those family surnames did not help her in her search. R assumed that she would not find her actual biological parents unless they submitted a DNA test via ancestry.com. Which is what happened with T.

She is a lovely person, solid and good. There are many interesting similarities between her (and her children) and the rest of T's family. We have grown-up grandchildren now, and another son-in-law!!!! Plus our daughter, M, now has a sister! When I wrote my bit about the concept of
Grace a while back, this is what I was referring to; this unbelievably mind-altering, joyous cosmic gift.






29 comments:

  1. Awesome is an overused word but this is just that, awesome.

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  2. That is amazing, and your atitude too. I shall look if there is also the same thing here.

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    1. I'm sure ancestry.com or 23andMe are both international in scope.

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  3. My husband was adopted and has done DNA testing with hopes in finding his biological father. So far only a 3rd cousin which is like finding a needle in a haystack.
    But how exciting for all of you! I bet your husband is so excited!

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    1. If you've used ancestry.com and eventually there are two are three "cousins," he will likely be able to pinpoint a common ancestor for himself and all his cousins. That will point him in the right direction. My husband is very excited and happy. It is amazing to see his loving reaction to this new daughter. And our shared daughter is also thrilled to have a sister. Until now she has been an only child.

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  4. This story brings good tears to my eyes. I'm happy for all of you. This is totally awesome!

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    1. Thanks, Robin. We feel so lucky that it has all worked out so well.

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  5. Replies
    1. Undeserved, unasked for, and changes one's life for the better. Doesn't get much better than that.

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  6. Congratulations! One of Beloved's closest friends just discovered he has a second daughter (complete with grandkids) in Australia. It's a lovely miracle to expand the family.

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    1. Miracle is a good way to describe it. Can you freakin' believe it, Chilly?

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  7. Total WOW! Thanks for sharing - so interesting! And congrats, too!

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    1. Thanks! I feel like screaming to anyone who will listen, "It's a girl!!!!

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  8. I am so happy for your family. The DNA testing gave you a marvelous gift.

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    1. Sure did. It doesn't always work out so well. We are lucky. Life is complicated and strange.

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  9. This is simply a lovely story. What a wonderful surprise in a day when unexpected news can often be so opposite. Thank you for sharing.

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    1. My pleasure. I've been struggling in writing this post for many months. I have a hard time writing about something so personal.

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  10. Amazing and welcome to the new family members!

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  11. That was a good result. I was not impressed with my results from the company at all, nor was my first Cousin. But I suppose if they do manage to get it right there can be some positives to the finding of long lost relatives. The thing I take issue with is that they allege there are 'race' genes when in fact there is no such thing.

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    1. Yes, the best thing those do is the DNA matches. The heritage aspect seems "iffy." Like I said on your post, I had mine done both at ancestry.com and 23andMe and the heritage percentages (and even some ethnicities) are quite different. Thanks for your DNA post! It gave me the courage to write this long overdue post about the most important thing that has happened to my family in ages.

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    2. It is important and wonderful now to have this Daughter included in your lives and I am sure it is significant to her as well to be embraced and accepted as Family! I'm so Happy for you all!

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  12. Sometimes the universe just opens up and gives us amazing gifts!

    I think this service would be very interesting for my daughters who were conceived by an anonymous donor. Can a person opt out of having their results shared?

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    1. If all you want is heritage, I'd go with 23andMe, and they allow a person to opt out of sharing info. I'm not sure about ancestry.com.

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  13. It was really a surprise to know about our family history:)

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So, whadayathink?